Course Details

International Business Law Negotiation

This 3 credit course, offered during the Fall semester, is structured around a semester-long simulated negotiation exercise in which the students in this class will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the students in a similar class at Stanford University School of Law will represent a US pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses a special extract produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiation via state-of-the-art Telepresence Systems at the San Francisco and Chicago offices of DLA Piper on five scheduled Saturday morning classes. Due to space limitations in the Telepresence facility, the Fall offering of this class must be limited to 14 students. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, and to give students experience in drafting communications and actual negotiations. Students will also learn about the legal and business issues that may arise in joint ventures, supply agreements, and licensing agreements. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, often working in teams of two or more, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as preparing for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. NOTE: This class has five Saturday morning sessions as well as the Wednesday evening sessions. The Saturday sessions are devoted to the live negotiations with Stanford University and will be held at the Chicago offices of DLA Piper (near LaSalle and Lake St.) so that we can utilize state-of-the-art video conferencing facilities. Due to the Saturday sessions, the weekday sessions will start later in the semester. Also, it is expected that students taking this course will already have some knowledge, either from their practical experience or from taking relevant courses, of the substantive legal issues that may arise in this exercise. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: In order to successfully complete this seminar, students must meet the following requirements: 1) Active participation in (i) class discussions regarding the preparation of the written exchanges in the negotiation, (ii) the live negotiations, and (iii) class analysis of the process and progress of the negotiations. Participation in the exercise will constitute 40% of the final grade. 2) Throughout the class and the negotiations, each student must keep a journal of the student's impressions of the process, strategy and progress of the negotiations. There should be one journal entry to each class session devoted to the negotiation (beginning with Class 3) and one for each live negotiation session. Each entry should be approximately one page. The journal should contain the student's critical assessment of (i) the class' communications to American University, (ii) the process of drafting each communication, (iii) the responses received from American University, and (iv) the live negotiations with American University. The journal will be handed in on the last class date and will constitute 30% of the final grade. 3) Serve as a Lead Advisor (generally in a team of two or more) in designated classes and video conferences during the simulation exercise. The functions of the Lead Advisor include: Preparing an initial draft communication for the class to consider as it develops MCC's next communication in the negotiations with KJH, chairing class discussions and preparing the final communication to KJH, and submitting the communication to KJH in a timely manner. (KJH meets on Wednesdays in Chicago, so that the MCC communication must be submitted by 10:00 am on Tuesday mornings. 4) Write a 10-12 page retrospective paper after the conclusion of the exercise. More detailed instructions will be provided in class. This paper will constitute 30% of the final grade. COURSE MATERIALS: There is a reasonable amount of reading materials required for this course, including materials for the first class, which should be read prior to the first class. Pre-requisite: Negotiation LLM students may enroll in Negotiation and International Business Law Negotiation concurrently with professor permission

Catalog Number: LITARB 604
Practice Areas: Civil Lit. and Dispute Resolution

Course History


Fall 2014
Title: International Business Law Negotiation
Faculty: Chadha, S. Paul (courses | profile)
Section: 1     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 14     Actual: 11


Spring 2014
Title: International Business Law Negotiation
Faculty: Chadha, S. Paul (courses | profile)
Section: 1     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 24     Actual: 20


Fall 2013
Title: International Business Law Negotiation
Faculty: Chadha, S. Paul (courses | profile)
Section: 1     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 14     Actual: 13


Fall 2012
Title: International Business Law Negotiation
Faculty: Chadha, S. Paul (courses | profile)
Section: 1     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 12     Actual: 11


Fall 2011
Title: Int'l Business Law Negotiation
Faculty: Chadha, S. Paul (courses | profile)
Section: 1     Type: Advocacy     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 12     Actual: 11