Course Details

Law and Social Change

This course is an examination of the relationship between legal institutions (primarily the courts) and social change in United States. Emphasis is given to "litigation campaigns," which seek to use the courts to bring about social change. The substantive areas used to illustrate these relationships include several in which there have been substantial legal and social change in the recent past, such as race, gender, and sexual orientation. Registration Requirements: This course is NOT a Perspective Elective. It is an Open Elective for First-Year Students, and it is open to second and third year students. Teaching Method: Discussion, Films/videos, Readings, Research Project (There will be a paper option instead of the final exam) Evaluation Method: Final Exam, Final Paper (Students may write a paper OR take the final exam), Class Participation (After grading the final exam or the paper, I will also take into account class participation in determining grades for the course, in exceptional cases. I will raise the grade for the course to reward consistently excellent work in class throughout the semester, e.g., from a B to a B+, or from a B+ to an A.) Course Materials: Brest, et.al, Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking ISBN 0-7355-5062-X Gerald N. Rosenberg, The Hollow Hope: Can the Courts Bring About Social Change ISBN-13: 978-0-226-7261-7 (paper)


Catalog Number: CONPUB 645
Practice Areas: Constitutional Law & Procedure
Additional Course Information: Open to First Year Students


Course History

Spring 2014
Title: Law and Social Change
Faculty: Rubinowitz, Leonard S. (courses  |  homepage)
Section: 1     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 59     Actual: 34



Spring 2013
Title: Law and Social Change
Faculty: Rubinowitz, Leonard S. (courses  |  homepage)
Section: 1     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 59     Actual: 33



Spring 2012
Title: Law and Social Change
Faculty: Rubinowitz, Leonard S. (courses  |  homepage)
Section: 1     Type: Lecture     Credits: 3.0
Capacity: 65     Actual: 51